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>> was the president right to kick out the u.s. drug enforcement commission. you are watching "inside story." captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> as a former farmer himself, abel morales can to power in libya promising to help produce cocoa. he kicked at the u.s. drug enforcement administration and begin the country's own system regulating cocoa leaf production. it is an awesome and controversial partnership. it brought heavy criticism from washington. it left to the u.s. government to conclude that bolivia was failing to meet its commitment to fight production of cocaine. a new report suggests the country's on orthodox measures -- unorthodox measures are working. katherine is from the information network. she is one of the members of the -- office of the report. >> the u.s. policy position had a great deal of frustration on the part of oblivion's throughout the country that all u.s. funding was ties to forced eradication -- on the part of bolivians cure of the country that all u.s. funding was tied to forced eradication. it was seen as somethi
us? >> i've been reading through the stam and they feel there's been a pause in the u.s. economy and they're not yet confidence about the job situation. they want to see a lower unemployment rate. they will continue their current ease to support the economy. the u.s. federal reserve made the decision at a two-day meeting of it federal open market committee that ended wednesday. the policymakers said in a statement that growth and economic activity had paused in recent months. this was despite improvements in the housing market, personal spending and business the deraserve attributed the slow down to a high jobless rate and the effects of hurricane sandy which hit the u.s. east coast last year. the fed said it will continue buying mortgage backed securities and treasury bonds worth $85 billion a month. the key interest rate will be kept at virtually zero as long as the unemployment rate stays above 6.5%. the u.s. jobless rate stood at 7.8% in december. the u.s. economy shrank in the first months. officials at the u.s. commerce department released on wednesday the preliminary gross
inaugural address, the u.s. drone strike kills three people in yemen. today we look at the new documentary, "dirty wars: the world is a battlefield." >> dimon's sue was nothing like kabul. life is defined by the war. everything revolves around it. in yemen, there was no war, of these not officially. >> the film, "dirty wars," follows jeremy scahill to afghanistan, somalia, and yemen as he chases down the hidden truth behind america's expanding covert wars. we will speak with jeremy and the film's director, rick rowley. >> night rates have risen to astronomical levels where there are 1000 raids a month happening. decades after vietnam, one decade into this war, we have gone back to body counts is our only way of measuring any kind of progress in the war. >> broadcasting from the sundance film festival in park city, utah, all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. hundreds of thousands packed into the national mall on monday for president obama's second term inauguration. in an address many saw as a blueprint for a m
. alleged u.s. army whistleblower bradley manning has had his potential sentence reduced should he be convicted for the leaking of classified documents to wikileaks. on tuesday, the judge overseeing the pre-trial hearing said manning is entitled to 112 days less in prison due to the unlawful conditions of his imprisonment and marine corps brig corn, -- in quantico, virginia. manning's ordeal included being held in a six by 8 foot cell for a least 23 hours a day and being banned from lying down or even leaning against the wall unless was sleeping. his attorney argued his imprisonment was so harsh and inhumane, that either his charges should be dropped or he should be given 10 times credit for the nine months he spent there in any sentence he received. in her ruling, judge lind agreed with the allegations of unlawful abuse, but said manning will only get one to one credit in the reduction of any sentence. in a statement, the bradley manning support network said -- a u.s. military contractor has agreed to pay a more than $5 million settlement to 71 former prisoners who suffered tortur
'll give top priority to strengthening the japan/u.s. alliance. he said he hopes to visit the united states soon for a summit with president barack obama. >> translator: through the meeting i want to show my country and also the world that the strong bond between japan and the u.s. has been restored. >> abe said japanese and u.s. officials are now working out the timing of his visit. >>> people in japan are getting back to the grind after the new year holidays, streets, trains and offices were full on friday across the country. residents in the northeast are heading into 2013 facing the work they left behind by the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident. people who went to the first auction the year at this market in iwaty prefecture are still seeing fewer fish than they did before the disaster. market spokespersons say the catch between april and december last year is almost 90% of what it used to be. still bidders were able to buy salmon, scallops and other fish on friday. >> translator: i'm very happy that we can hold new year's opening sales as usual. >> reconstruction minister g
.b.m. super computer that's leading u.s. innovation into the future. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. we also meet some smaller all- american businesses surviving and thriving as the global marketplace gets more competitive. >> susie: we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: innovation and competitiveness. these two words attract a lot of attention by investors, business leaders and politicians as the u.s. worries about its status as a global economic leader. america has a long history as the world's leading innovator, but what will it take to remain competitive and remain a beacon of innovation? with the markets closed for the martin luther king, jr., holiday, we bring you this "n.b.r." special edition. tonight, we begin with a look at american innovation today. suzanne pratt has the story. >> reporter: the u.s. has put the world behind the wheel and an iphone in millions of pockets, but we may be losing our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public edu
, which gave iraqis who helped the u.s. government or military the opportunity to receive special refugee status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have been expanded to the more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who had already been settled in the united states. according to press reports this past february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with tie
in 2010 have reached a settlement with the u.s. justice department. transocean will pay to resolve their holpart of the deepwater horizon disaster. john boehner has been elected speaker of the house for the next two years. it was 24 hours after he drew criticism over his actions to resolve the fiscial clif. uni nazir was killed in pakistan -- he is one of the leaders accused of sending fighters into afghanistan but was seen as a friend in the pakistani state. for more on the use of drones, we have -- from the south asian council. how important a figure was this man? >> it is a huge, symbolic act. he has been replaced by someone else. the key message is the u.s. will follow and take out people crossing the border. if he was a friend to pakistan or if they were allowing him to operate because he wasn't attacking pakistan is a different matter. but his people along with similar groups were on the fringes, harboring elements that continue to attack the pakistani state. >> we have seen criticism of the u.s. drone policy -- would you expect more of that? a> in recent months there is heig
>> the u.s. president allows the government to continue spying on americans and others without a warrant. you are watching "inside story america" from washington. >> hello. the u.s. capitol is preparing for the inauguration of barack obama. it was before his inauguration four years ago that civil liberties groups had high hopes that president obama would do away with laws put in place by his predecessor that violate u.s. constitutional rights in the name of national security. on sunday, they were disappointed when president obama rhee authorized the foreign intelligence surveillance act 00 re- -- re- authorized the foreign intelligence surveillance act. last week, three u.s. senators tried to amend the legislation to put into protection protections for americans. republicans and democrats came together to reject the proposal in favor of u.s. national security of our constitutional rights. back in our washington, d.c. studios, we are joined by a national security analyst. we also have a legislative counsel for the american civil liberties union and the executive director of the
the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around world. ricardo cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry and slinger to keep the coca-cola co. supplied with cocoa while trying to ban its use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book "a secret history of coffee, coca and cola", a tale of coffee, coca-cola, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and the future of prohibition. ricardo cortes is creator and illustrator of subversive books for all ages but mostly all ages about such things as marijuana and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much profit, how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring they come into this country and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. san ho tree and, though -- ca e carletta anhgo. i want to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming
this spring is not expected to let up. but the u.s. combat role will never be the same. >> our troops will continue to fight alongside afghans when needed, but let me say it as plainly as i can: starting this spring our troops will have a different mission. training, advising, assisting afghan forces. it will be an historic moment and another step toward full afghan sovereignty, something i know president karzai cares deeply about, as do the afghan people. >> reporter: mr. obama and the afghan president agreed to accelerate by a couple of months the transition of u.s. forces from combat to training. karzai endorsed the move and welcomed a smaller u.s. troop presence. >> numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it's the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. >> reporter: the next big decision: how many u.s. forces will remain in afghanistan after 2014. pentagon recommendations range from 3,000 to 9,000. and if deployed, scott, at least a third of those would be devoted to finding and killing the remna
america." the u.s. and afghan president meet to chart the future of america's mission. >> by the end of next year, 2014, the transition will be complete. afghans will have full responsibility for their security and this war will come to where responsible end. >> joining the fight in mali, french troops aiding in a battle against islamist rebels. and three years after disaster struck in haiti, one journalist to was there that they tells us about the long road to recovery. -- one journalist who was there that day tells us about the long road to recovery. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. more than 10 years, u.s. forces have been at war in afghanistan, but today the leaders of both countries stood side by side in washington to announce that they are accelerating the all important and over. by this spring, afghan security forces are expected to take the lead across the country, with u.s. troops shifting fully to a support role. >> this is america's longest war. forged from the attacks on the york and washington, launched acros
of time. >> on diplomacy, abe said he'll give top priority to strengthening the japan/u.s. alliance. he said he hopes to visit the united states soon for a summit with president barack obama. >> translator: through the meeting i want to show my country and also the world that the strong bond between japan and the u.s. has been restored. >> abe said japanese and u.s. officials are now working out the timing of his visit. prime minister abe's special envoy conveyed the willingness to improve ties with south korea. the president-elect park gave a positive response. they pointed out the need to face bilateral issues. abe hopes the new governments can build good relations. he handed park a letter from the prime minister expressing the wish. park said south korea and japan need each other in many ways. she said she hopes to work on reconciliation and cooperation while facing issues related to their common history. >> translator: we confirmed our shared view that we should improve ties from a broad perspective, even though there are several outstanding bilateral issues. >>> south korean presid
. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical for companies and societies to survive and thrive. and yes, there is a magic ingredient. >> continuity. in the down cycles of the economy, the temptation is always, "well, we'll just cut the front end, we won't do our research, we're not going to work on development." so you empty the pipe. then, when the economy turns-- and it always turns-- when that economy turns, you have nothing in the pipe, and people run you over out of the gate. >> reporter: but, not all innovation happens in multibillion-dollar labs. here in manhattan's fa
wants to run the cia. cleaning up the mortgage massive 2000 aid. u.s. banks agreed to settle billions of dollars worth of compensation claims. challenging china's new leadership, a journalist protest over censorship in her rare public display of dissent. -- in a rare public display of dissent. the u.s. president has nominated two key allies to top jobs in his new administration. chuck hagel will become the first former soldier to hold the post of secretary of defense. john brennan would become the new head of cia. both appointments have to be approved by the u.s. senate. nominations have already caused controversy. >> president obama is putting the finishing touches to his national security team. introducing the man he wants to lead the pentagon and cia. >> these two leaders have dedicated their lives to protecting our country. i urge the senate to confirm them as soon as possible. >> both nominees face difficult questions before they are confirmed in the u.s. senate. chuck hagel seems perfect for the pentagon. a former republican senator from nebraska. some conservatives say he is no
. the owners of a drilling rig that sank in 2010 have reached a settlement with the u.s. justice department. transocean will pay to resolve their holpart of the deepwater horizon disaster. john boehner has been elected speaker of the house for the next two years. it was 24 hours after he cedrew criticism over his actions to resolve the fiscial clif. uni nazir was killed in pakistan -- he is one of the leaders accused of sending fighters into afghanistan but was seen as a friend in the pakistani state. for more on the use of drones, we have -- from the south asian council. how important a figure was this man? >> it is a huge, symbolic act. he has been replaced by someone else. the key message is the u.s. will follow and take out people crossing the border. if he was a friend to pakistan or if they were allowing him to operate because he wasn't attacking pakistan is a different matter. but his people along with similar groups were on the fringes, harboring elements that continue to attack the pakistani state. >> we have seen criticism of the u.s. drone policy -- would you expect more of that?
the u.s. military compare with other countries like britain? our defense correspondent has a closer look. >> thousands of women in the u.s. military had been facing daily dangers on the front line in iraq and afghanistan. when it comes to the fighting, it has mostly been done by men. women have been trained to kill but prevented from joining infantry units. the senior military commander confesses this makes little sense. >> women are fighting, they are dying, and have shown have great skills. the one thing they will probably look at is not changing training standards to accommodate women. >> now, president obama like to overturn the ban. he has the backing of u.s. military chiefs to break down the barriers. a u.s. marine captain has done two tours in afghanistan, it is not about gender. >> i want to make the point that we are not looking to just reserve a spot for women, we are trying to give people a chance to compete for the spot. some women cannot do it just like some men cannot do it. the policy being repealed it says that they have a chance. >> the vast majority of britain's armed f
then turned his attention to diplomacy and national security. he said japanese and u.s. leaders should strengthen their alliance to restore the tight bond their countries once enjoyed. he promised to take firm action own territorial disputes close to home. >> translator: the government will properly develop and better administer japanese islands near borders with other nations and boost security there. i declare that we'll protect the lives and property of japanese nationals and protect our country's territory. >> prime minister abe closed his speech by saying only that people of japan can make the country strong. . >>> prime minister abe and barack obama are expected to meet in washington. u.s. ties gave us his perspective on the important issues facing the alliance. michael green served on the white house national security council as director of asian affairs under the bush administration. he spoke with nhk world. >> strategically, the u.s. and japan have a common interest in setting a high standard for transparency, rule of law and market access. >> michael green believes japan has
spent some time thinking and talking of late in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. and grant said, you know, at the time i do not think there was ever a more wicked more than that waged by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but th
know, turkish coffee, we have english tea time, and, of course, the tobacco fortunes that drove u.s. and european development. and so long story short, the reason half the world got colonized in some ways is because of a bunch of old white end men in europe couldn't get it up. [laughter] so there you have sex, drugs and international relations in a nutshell. [laughter] but i tell the story because what we consider drugs is important. and so when the mostly white males of european ancestry who drafted this 1961 international convention got to exempt all of their favorite drugs, the ones they were partial to and got accustomed to; coffee, alcohol, tea, you know, all these things that they loved to do. but coca was manager that indigenous -- was something that indigenous people used, indians. and it was those racist attitudes that made them say, you know, this is forbidden. this is terrible stuff. but, in fact, coca in its natural form is, actually, i think, a very beneficial plant and relatively harmless. it's a very, very, very mild stimulant, if my opinion. in my opinion. from perso
today to weigh in on whether the airline should merge with u.s. airways. ira epstein of the linn group joins us now. always a pleasure to have you on the show. what is going on with the market? it is so resilient. where is all this money coming from ira? > > think about it: 2012, the end of the year, we didn't know where we were in taxes, people selling off lots of things, not knowing where capital gains were going to go. now that money is hot. it needs a place to go. people are not thinking interest rates are the place. they are thinking the stock market. they're looking for dividend returns and appreciation. and so far, that is what they are getting. so even on the brakes in the stock market, we are seeing new money flows - big new money flows - coming into the market now. and that will probably continue another week or two. then we'll get back to what i call more normal trading. > commodities traders are on their toes these days, especially with the crop news that has been coming in - we have drought issues, cold issues, and frost issues over in california. what is happening? > > on
>>> with a late night vote the u.s. house passes a bill to avoid the fiscal cliff, but president obama warns us he doesn't want to go to the brink in the next fight over the debt ceiling. >> i will not have another debate with this congress over whether or not they should pay the bills that they've already racked up through the laws that they passed. >>> the budget deal boosts asian stocks in hong kong and australia hitting 19-month highs in the first trading session of the year. >>> european equities also share a deal out of washington despite more gloom from the eurozone. manufacturing has continued to contract according to the latest pmi. >>> okay. 2013, a warm welcome to viewers of "worldwide exchange." my special families to a family called the wards. thank you for hosting my family over the new year. personalities out of the way, eurozone, still looking glum despite the market reaction to the fiscal cliff deal this morning. to recap, the eurozone december following manufacturer pmi, 46.1, the flash was 46.3. the final output index, 46, weaker than the 46.1 flash, 46.1 in de
by an unmanned u.s. plane. he was one of the top commanders. it was part of the tribal region where the united states has been targeting insurgent leaders. he has been killed with five others. we are joined from islamabad for more on who the man was. >> he was a senior commander from the south region who was active in carrying out attacks inside afghanistan. he made no secret of it. he was a respected member of the tribe. the tribe lives on both sides of the border. he offered a great help to the pakistani authorities when he took on the fallen fighters. he moved them from their territory and it enabled the pakistani military to go on a major offensive against another try. an important figure -- against another try and. tribe.her >> the strikes appear to be undermining efforts to come to a truce in the region. >> it was not just been thrown strike that killed him, but another strike that had not far away. there were two drones strikes. 10 people killed and four other people killed. a rescue is underway to see if there are any survivors. there have been questions about the thrones strikes. paki
. >> this was both a return to the kind of fiery anti-u.s. rhetoric that has been notable by its actions during kim jong-un's first year in power and the confirmation that a third nuclear test was in the works. that confirmation comes as no surprise to south korea. the defense ministry debriefing saying that the proportions of the test site in northeastern north korea were now complete. >> we consider north korea is ready to conduct a nuclear test at any time if the leadership decides to go ahead. we are monitoring the north's nuclear test preparations and its military movement based on its defense position. >> the u.s. special representative on north korea policy called on p'yongyang not to carry out a nuclear test. >> it would be highly provocative, it would set back the cause of trying to find a solution to these longstanding problems that have prevented the peninsula from becoming reunited. i think it's important that they do not test. >> davies also used his visit -- the policy that the nuclear test would make harder to fulfil in her first month in office. in the past, north korea has tied suc
i.o.u.s is turning into a debate over the defition of a "debt default." why washington's wrangling could hurt the u.s. economy. >> susie: and from chipotle to dunkin' donuts, did fast food chains meet investors' appetites for big returns? we're talking food stocks. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: we begin with banking. two giant financial powerhouses reported big gains in fourth quarter earnings today. j.p. morgan chase booked its third straight year of record profits. and goldman sachs reported fourth quarter earnings that were almost triple the same period a week ago. erika miller reports. >> reporter: before we get to jp morgan's profits, let's talk about the earnings of it's c.e.o., jamie dimon. the board cut his pay in half as punishment for a more than $6 billion loss at j.p. morgan's london trading desk. but dimon will still pocket a $10 million bonus. add on $1.5 million in salary, and his total compensation was $11.5 million last year. >> we don't think it's inappropriate, what the board did. butt the end of the day jamie dimon is stl doing pretty well f
of federal funds to transfer guantanamo prisoners to u.s. soil. 166 prisoners remain in guantanamo, which opened 11 years ago this week. 86 of them have been cleared for release. today we look at the case of one man, al jazeera's sami al-hajj, the only journalist held at guantanamo. held by the u.s. military for more than six years without charge, sami al-hajj was reportedly tortured repeatedly tortured, attack by dogs, hung from the ceiling. in january 2007, he began a hunger strike that lasted 438 days until his release. >> i go on hunger strike for many reasons. we are held in guantanamo without charge, without cause. they did not give us a chance to go to court about our case. >> today, a "democracy now!" exclusive, an extended broadcast interview with sami al-hajj from the headquarters of al jazeera in doha. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. a u.s. drone attack has killed eight people in the pakistani region of north waziristan. pakistani officials said the dead are suspected militants, including an
was, at least as far as the rapprochement between the u.s., the west and libya was a period which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004 to 2006 when a small group of us was sent to tripoli to, basically, lay the foundations for what became the embassy. i, you know, i've spent a lot of time in the middle east. sometimes i wonder whether i should have studied japanese back when i was if college because, you know, the degree of changeability and if i could say drama just, you know, continues. but, you know, there's a certain something about the reason about the people and the disparate cultures that is quite gripping, and the more you get into it, the more you become passionate about it. and i've certainly been very passionate about libya, and that's, essentially -- some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya basically drove the desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me -- it was very surprising -- in different contexts whether they were taxi drivers, people who were poised to make lots of money as c
on "democracy now!" from the beginning, almost 17 years ago. the film explores how u.s. intervention in latin america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the boo
saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netanyahu says he is prepared to work with the naturalist home. and we'll take a look at travel chaos acr
what is recorded as the end of the u.s. combat mission in iraq gets listed in the history books as september 2010. it was not the end of everything in iraq for the united states when we went through that transition, but it was really when what started in 2003 finally started to end. the page was turned. >> operation iraqi freedom is over, and the iraqi people now have lead responsibility for the security of their country. >> when president obama spoke that night, there were still 50,000 u.s. troops in iraq, and 50,000 americans stayed in iraq after that night for another 14 months until everyone finally left the following december, december 2011. but when the mission changed from a combat mission to the train, advise, assist mission, then it wasn't operation iraqi freedom anymore. it wasn't that same war. it was the way that war came to an end, and that's why it was worth interrupting "wipeout" and "ncis" that night and all the other 8:00 p.m. programing. and that's why it was worth -- at least for me i thought it was worth -- flying out to baghdad to be there for that historic
you see a little comparison between the u.s.? one of the things he talked about was the u.s. had just dealt with their bank problems after awful lot quicker. and here in europe, the eurozone is a lot further behind the curve. so one looks at this and wonders whether, you know, we haven't gotten to gribs with the fundamental problems and how much of a hint that is. >> well, i certainly agree with the idea that we're much further mind the u.s. and particularly continental europe. what's more, the banking system is a much bigger path. the banking system, that weighs more heavily on the growth and on the economic outlook in europe than it would do in the u.s. so we're hit by this double whammy on the two sides. a bigger system and a less well functioning system. at the same time, the bare dockses of where we stand in europe right now, the type of measures introduced by the ecb notably over the last 18 months have been one that sort odd prevented a disastrous clash in the banking sector, so it's threatening europe a little more than a year ago when funding markets were choking up under the
growth. china is slowing down, the eurozone is still suffering and the u.s. economy remains precarious so abe is determined to turn around the japanese economy. of course from is a political dimension to this. japanese vote again in july in the election for the upper house and abe needs to show he's doing something to speed the recovery. >> there's a lot of money involved. the question is will it work? >> certainly these measures will provide a temporary boost but they will not solve the underlying problems. abe says he'll build his economic policy on three pillars -- increased public spending, monetary easing and doing more to encourage growth. we've seen in the stimulus how abe plans to spend taxpayers' money. on top of that he is urging the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2% and to get more money flowing through the economy. the lines on the final pillar measures toward growth are less clear. some have insisted sustainable growth will only come by making industries more competitive through deregulation. but, government leaders have yet to articulate how they'll make that ha
by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." >>> lawmakers in the u.s. house of representatives have passed legislation to resolve the fiscal cliff. economists had warned about the simultaneous arrival of tax increases and spending cuts. in the end, republicans listened to those warnings and approved a bill to raise taxes on wealthy americans. >> on this vote the yeas are 257, the nays are 167. the motion is adopted. without objection, a motion to reconsider is laid on the table. >> the senate approved the bill then passed it to the republican-dominated lower house. the legislation maintains tax cuts for the middle class and it raises taxes with people of annual incomes of $400,000 or more. and couples with incomes of $450,000 or more. the bill also postpones by two months major spending cuts that were scheduled to take effect during the day. some house republicans wanted to rework the bill. they complained it did not contain enough cuts, especially on social security. economists have warned for months that if lawmakers did not reach a deal, the economy would
suffering and the u.s. economy remains precarious so abe is determined to turn around the japanese economy. of course from is a political dimension to this. japanese vote again in july in the election for the upper house and abe needs to show he's doing something to speed the recovery. >> there's a lot of money involved. the question is will it work? >> certainly these measures will provide a temporary boost but they will not solve the underlying problems. abe says he'll build his economic policy on three pillars -- increased public spending, monetary easing and doing more to encourage growth. we've seen in the stimulus how abe plans to spend taxpayers' money. on top of that he is urging the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2% and to get more money flowing through the economy. the lines on the final pillar measures toward growth are less clear. some have insisted sustainable growth will only come by making industries more competitive through deregulation. but, government leaders have yet to articulate how they'll make that happen. >> you just mentioned this could be a temporary
tsukamoto, nhk world, seoul. >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has urged north koa to give up on the idea of conducting another nuclear test. she made the appeal during a question and answer session with citizens and reporters around the world. she'll leave office on friday. clinton said she has been watching how kim jong un has developed as a leader. >> we expected him to focus on improving the lives of the north korean people, not just the elite but everyone, to have more education, more openness, more opportunity. and instead he has engaged in very provocative rhetoric and behavior. >> clinton said u.s. officials will work together with their allies to try to change that behavior. she underscored the importance of north korea's closest ally. >> we want to see a rising power like china join the international community as a responsible stakehold er, continue its extraordinary efforts to lift hundreds of millions of people out of poverty, create a strong vital middle class, have respectful relations with its neighbors in all of the ways on land and sea that that is required. >
. >> when president obama spoke that night there were still 50,000 u.s. troops in iraq and 50,000 americans stayed in iraq for another 14 months until everyone left the following december. december 2011. when the mission changed from a combat mission to the trained advised mission then it wasn't operation iraqi freedom. it was the way that war came to an end an that's why it was worth interrupting wipeout and the other 8:00 p.m. programming. that's why it was worth flying out to baghdad to be there for that historic ending as the combat mission ended. that's what happened on august 31st and september 1st, 2010. today that's what the president said is going to happen this spring in afghanistan. that's same transition. the president announced a newly sped up timetable for how the war will wind down in afghanistan. >> today we agree that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announcing the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a support role this spring. starting this spring our troops will have a different mission. training, advicing and assisting afgha
reconstruction efforts in afghanistan said the u.s. risks losing billions of dollars without proper oversight of the projects. those remarks same at the same time that president karzai. this is 50 mens. >> thank you very much. and thank you very much for everyone showing up this afternoon. they were very generous comments and i am honored to be here today at the stimson center, an institution named for and inspired by a man who helped to guide the nation through some of the most difficult challenges that we have ever faced. and an organization that i remember calling upon for guidance and assistance on many occasions, particularly when i was working for sam, who i had the pleasure to work with for about 17 years. i remember at the old offices, north of dupont circle, many a day talking to barry and mike and a team of experts on proliferation issues, loose nukes, chemical and biological warfare issues. so it's a great institution and it's an honor to come back here. this is only the second time i've been to your new office and it's fantastic. little did i know, two months ago approximately, wh
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